illustrations that mimic airplane safety instruction cards correspond with the headline-writing tips in the story

Write digital headlines both readers and Google will love

Here are some characteristics of good display and SEO headlines, plus some advice for chasing down an elusive muse.

A hand with a formula written on it is in the foreground in front of a laptop with a test question, implying that the test taker is referencing her hand to get the right answer.

Use this radio-to-web cheat sheet to write for digital with ease

Plenty of broadcast reporters and editors think of digital stories as an afterthought.

A simple script for your diverse source tracking needs

Ask these questions in an interview to get the data you crave!

Build your audience with SEO descriptions and custom URLs

Custom URLs and SEO descriptions make Google happy and give your posts a boost in search.

How to keep a technical failure from wrecking your broadcast

“Weekend Edition” stayed on the air despite losing access to audio. These steps will help you survive — and avoid — disasters as well.

The case against collocations, word pairs that stifle creativity

Tired of using “fearless leader,” “stony silence” or other hackneyed duos? You should be. Break the habit.

The ‘Short Wave’ staff knows how to keep a daily pod sustainable

Launching a daily podcast is one thing — keeping it alive, day after day, is another.

Nut graf and lead duos that point readers in the right direction

Certain pairings are better than others. We present some compatible couples.

How to write a cover letter for a journalism job or internship

Please, please, PLEASE read this before applying to a position at a member station or NPR (or ANY journalism job, really).

The show editor’s interview checklist

On a show, the interview is brief and it is the story. So much depends on preparation, and having an editor’s ear.

Editors, keep your writers happy

Earn their love and respect, not their loathing and resentment.

Trill, buzz, floss, breathe: Coach yourself to sound your best

Do your guests sound nervous, flat, sing-song or just plain blah? These guides will cure their vocal woes.

For digital, flatten the pyramid and embrace the trapezoid

If you’re wedded to the inverted pyramid (or just don’t know any better), don’t get to the point — end on a flat note. Metaphorically.

Sit right and don’t forget to move: an ergonomics guide

You’ve got a decent chair and desk. So why does your back still hurt? Hint: It’s not the furniture’s fault.

Must-have math skills for the number-crunching newsperson

Refresh your high school math-class memory with this review of basic, yet confusing, concepts.

Protecting, cleaning and sanitizing your gear the right way

Keeping your gear safe and sanitary is not a one-step process. More like four to six steps. Get ’em here.

HAY-soos or hay-SOOS? Getting the accent right in Spanish

Unlike English, Spanish has rules of pronunciation that are simple and easy to learn.

A field guide to reporting on COVID-19 (bring plastic wrap)

Put on your mask and stock up on alcohol wipes — you’re going into the coronavirus-infested wilds.

During the pandemic, cover those we’ve left out

In times of crisis, journalists have the responsibility — even more so than usual — to seek out people who are often passed over by the media, even as stay-at-home orders make it harder to reach them.

It’s not a ‘Chinese’ virus: Let’s avoid pernicious shorthands

“Chinese virus.” “Hindu mobs.” Using geography, ethnicity and religion as modifiers is questionable at best and dangerous at worst.

Reporting from home: how NPR correspondents do it

Legions of journalists are now working from home. But NPR international correspondents have been doing it for years, even decades. Heed their advice.

Find experts using the Diverse Sources Database

NPR’s Source of the Week, a curated database of experts from racial and ethnic groups underrepresented in the media, was created to help the public media system diversify its source base.

The haiku of radio journalism: how to write a newscast spot

A spot must tell a complete story — no matter how complex or involved — in under a minute. It’s not easy to write, but we have guidance.

Triage your fact-checking: a method (and board game)

To help you think about journalistic accuracy on a deadline, we’ve developed a fact-checking triage method.

How they made it: the ‘I’ll Be Seeing You’ elephant episode

In this series, NPR’s Training team asks reporters, editors, engineers and producers, “How did you make that?”

despairing editorial calendar on top of a box of tree ornaments

If you do holiday service journalism, do this (not that)

It’s the time of year when few local and regional news outlets (including public radio) are spared. Here’s how to do it as best as it can be done.

How to decide what to cut (or not) in an interview

It’s no secret that pre-taped interviews on public radio are edited, sometimes considerably.

Should you write a question headline? It depends …

There are right ways and wrong ways to write question headlines.