Must-have math skills for the number-crunching newsperson

Refresh your high school math-class memory with this review of basic, yet confusing, concepts. And there’s a quiz!

Protecting, cleaning and sanitizing your gear the right way

Keeping your gear safe and sanitary is not a one-step process. More like four to six steps. Get ’em here.

HAY-soos or hay-SOOS? Getting the accent right in Spanish

Unlike English, Spanish has rules of pronunciation that are simple and easy to learn. We’ve got sound clips to help you!

A field guide to reporting on COVID-19 (bring plastic wrap)

Put on your mask and stock up on alcohol wipes — you’re going into the coronavirus-infested wilds.

During the pandemic, cover those we’ve left out

In times of crisis, journalists have the responsibility — even more so than usual — to seek out people who are often passed over by the media, even as stay-at-home orders make it harder to reach them.

It’s not a ‘Chinese’ virus: Let’s avoid pernicious shorthands

“Chinese virus.” “Hindu mobs.” Using geography, ethnicity and religion as modifiers is questionable at best and dangerous at worst.

Reporting from home: how NPR correspondents do it

Legions of journalists are now working from home. But NPR international correspondents have been doing it for years, even decades. Heed their advice.

The haiku of radio journalism: how to write a newscast spot

A spot must tell a complete story — no matter how complex or involved — in under a minute. It’s not easy to write, but we have guidance.

Triage your fact-checking: a method (and board game)

To help you think about journalistic accuracy on a deadline, we’ve developed a fact-checking triage method.

How they made it: the ‘I’ll Be Seeing You’ elephant episode

In this series, NPR’s Training team asks reporters, editors, engineers and producers, “How did you make that?”

despairing editorial calendar on top of a box of tree ornaments

If you do holiday service journalism, do this (not that)

It’s the time of year when few local and regional news outlets (including public radio) are spared. Here’s how to do it as best as it can be done.

How to decide what to cut (or not) in an interview

It’s no secret that pre-taped interviews on public radio are edited, sometimes considerably. What’s OK to take out? And when is it better to leave something in?

Should you write a question headline? It depends …

There are right ways and wrong ways to write question headlines. Right?

Friends don’t let friends use snowclones (like this one)

You’re probably using these ubiquitous journalistic crutches without even knowing it.

Tips from the Twitterverse on surviving two-ways

Smile, remember to breathe and be prepared to improvise when you’re a reporter on a two-way.

Pronounce like a polyglot: saying foreign names on air

What if the pronunciation of a name has you stumped — and you have to say it on air? Here’s how to do it accurately and understandably.

5 techniques to spell any name correctly, every time

Save yourself from embarrassing misspellings of proper nouns with these tips.

A guide to recording spatial audio for 360-degree video

Here’s what we’ve learned from our experimentation with 360 audio recording.