Eric Athas


Plan your editorial project in 13 steps (and with lots of sticky notes)

So you’ve decided to launch a new project — a vertical, a series, or something else. What happens next is usually a flurry of questions. Where do we start? What should we cover? What shouldn’t we cover? Who’s our audience? How is our thing different from all of the others out there covering _______ (tech, health or something else)? In

How NPR covered the Paris attacks

An NPR crew prepares a broadcast from Paris on November 18, 2015. Photo by Russell Lewis/NPR In the days after the attacks in Paris, NPR deployed on multiple fronts, with special coverage by shows, Newscast reports, continuous updates online, and on-the-ground stories by reporters, producers and hosts in Paris. Different types of stories emerged. Here is a sampling (and

This headline process can make your stories better

The exercise of coming up with a headline can also be a great way to come up with the right story idea. Here are a few ideas to get you started. While you’re at it, read this post to learn the characteristics of a great headline. Start brainstorming headlines at the idea stage Headline writing is an

9 types of local stories that people like to share

Learn about place explainers, crowd pleasers, curiosity stimulators and six other engagement-encouraging story types — all supported by data!

With the right packaging, serious stories can be shareable, too

We’ve heard this a lot lately: Fun stories, not serious stories, work on social media. But we’ve found otherwise. You can shape serious stories to make them shareable and more informative for the public. We’re not talking about watering down serious journalism — we’re talking about crafting stories for the digital audience. This happens every