Latina/o youth


Updated 04/17/21 | Location: Washington, D.C. | Subjects:

Deborah A. Santiago is the cofounder and CEO at Excelencia in Education, an organization that aims to improve Latino access in higher education. Santiago’s work concentrates on state and federal policy, financial aid, Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs), and the evaluation of effective institutional practices. She was recently appointed to the California Higher Education Recovery with Equity Taskforce.

Updated 04/02/21 | Location: California | Subjects: , , ,

Jessica L. Lavariega Monforti is dean of the College of Arts & Sciences at California Lutheran University. She is an expert on how public policy is impacted by gender, race and ethnicity — specifically on how Latino youth are impacted by technology, the military system and immigration policy.

Updated 04/18/21 | Location: Texas | Subjects: ,

Luis Zayas has been the dean of the Steve Hicks School of Social Work at the University of Texas, Austin and the Robert Lee Sutherland Chair in Mental Health and Social Policy. He is also a professor of psychiatry at the Dell Medical School and president of the Society for Social Work and Research.

Updated 04/06/21 | Location: Washington, D.C. | Subjects: , , ,

Mark Hugo Lopez is the director of global migration and demography research at Pew Research Center. He leads planning of the center’s research agenda on international demographic trends, international migration, U.S. immigration trends and the U.S. Latino community. He is an expert on immigration globally and in the U.S., world demography, U.S.

Updated 04/04/21 | Location: Maryland | Subjects: , , ,

Claudia Galindo is an associate professor of education policy at the University of Maryland, College Park’s College of Education. She spoke to NPR’s Claudio Sanchez in 2013 about the academic shortcomings of Latino children compared to their white counterparts.

Updated 04/04/21 | Location: Texas | Subjects: ,

Laura Donnelly, founder and CEO of Latinitas, a digital magazine empowering Latina youth through media and technology, told KUT she wants to teach young Latinas to replace negative media representations of Hispanic women with their own visions of success. “You ask a 9-year-old Latina girl, she knows that she is not officially represented in media.